On 15 December 2022, the UK Government launched an open consultation on its plan for the United Kingdom to become a Contracting State to the Hague Convention of 2 July 2019 on the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments in civil or commercial matters (the Hague Judgments Convention).

As part of the decision-making process on becoming a Contracting State, the Government is looking to gather wide-ranging perspectives, especially from who have experience of current cross-border litigation.

Based on the overall analysis, the Government will make a final decision on signing and ratifying and any declarations to be made, and commence the necessary processes to ensure that this can be achieved within a reasonable timescale, in consultation with the Devolved Administrations.

The Convention would be implemented in UK domestic law under the terms of the Private International Law (Implementation of Agreements) Act 2020, subject to appropriate parliamentary scrutiny. The Convention would enter into force for the United Kingdom 12 months after the date it deposits its instrument of ratification.

The consultation, which consists of 14 questions, is meant to remain open for eight weeks, that is, until 9 February 2023.

Further details concerning submissions are available here.

A paper summarising the responses to this consultation will be published in spring 2023. The response paper will be available on-line at gov.uk.

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